Tag Archives: temple

A cremation in Ubud….Bali, Indonesia

Having had some less than enjoyable experiences on the island of Flores, we booked a flight for the next day to Bali. Initially, we had decided to skip Bali, because it is full of tourists and always will be – especially since the ‘Eat, Pray, Love’ book/movie. We were very pleasantly surprised and found Ubud to be less crowded than expected (though it is the low season).

After a quick flight and a one hour shuttle from the airport, we arrived in Ubud, an artsy town in the center of the island. We spent the next week exploring the middle of the island, never even glimpsing the beach (except from the air). We had our first hot shower in weeks. It is incredible how a little bit of comfort can change the way you experience a place. Having stayed in some very seedy places, we are used to having very basic accommodations. Ubud is packed with affordable homestays that include hot breakfast, wifi and hot water. Ours also had a balcony with great view of the surrounding volcanoes, where we spent many afternoons waiting out the daily thunderstorms.

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Volcano in the distance

Bali is predominately Hindu, so the culture is completely different from all the other islands in Indonesia we have visited. The houses in Ubud all have ornate entrances to beautiful hidden gardens. On the front steps, before every meal, offerings are made with little woven  boxes of flowers, incense and a variety of other small goodies. Ubud has numerous art galleries and restaurants. The traditional art is unique to the island and we went to an art museum which showed different styles.

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Typical offering
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Lots of offerings
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Art
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Making an offering

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Riki has started taking pictures of bugs (ok, he’s been doing this for a few months, but this is the first time in awhile that he has chosen all the pictures – so it makes the cut)
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Orchid?
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Pretty typical house entrance

One day we went on a walk through the rice terraces, got lost, as we inevitably do and ended up in a construction site. The scenery is incredible, lush green rice stalks scattered with palm trees.

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Ducks
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Not lost yet

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Good idea – see how high you can jump on a small, slippery trail on the edge of a tall drop off

 

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Not to be outdone…

 

Having developed some ear issues while diving, I was able to find an English speaking doctor who gave me some drops to try. Unfortunately, all they caused an excruciating headache, which confirmed the scratch I had on my ear drum. So no diving for awhile. Hence, our inland adventure.

We hired a taxi for the day and went to see some temples around Ubud. We also stopped at the Tegalalang rice terraces and a chocolate factory in the largest bamboo structure (in the world?). We also stopped in a village known for its paintings, but we were far from able to afford the fabulous pieces they had to offer.

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Tegalalang rice terraces

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Aren’t we a handsome couple?
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Mostly bamboo structure – unfortunately they seem to have a drainage issue
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Gunung Kawi Temple
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Gunung Kawi temple
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Tirta Empul – holy spring

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On one of our last days, we came across a large white bull in the street. After asking numerous people, we deduced that a priest had died and the cremation ceremony was happening that afternoon. Just our luck. We went off to lunch and returned with our sarongs and sashes to parade from the town to the Monkey Forest, where the cremation was to take place.

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Putting rice on their foreheads
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Scary masked man
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Waiting

The parade was an amazing spectacle, men carrying the giant white bull were running in circles and there was music and drumming. People were lined up along the road, just like a Mardi Gras parade. And it was a happy affair. There was another group of guys carrying the body, which we didn’t realize was the body. It just looked like a really ornate throne.

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Throne
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Spinning the bull around in the middle of the street

Upon reaching the Monkey Forest, we followed the crowd and watched as offerings were made and the body was put inside the giant bull. And then they fired up the gas and burned the whole bull. (We asked about taking pictures and were told it was fine.)

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Preparing to remove the white shrouded body from the coffin and place him in the bull.
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Blessing the body
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Burning the bull with the body inside
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Monkeys watching

At one point, a neighboring tree got a little singed and was doused by the nearby firemen. Riki got a little wet from that.

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Spraying down the trees

We watched for awhile, until the body dropped into the fire pit and the bull’s head fell off. Then we headed into the Monkey Forest to find some monkeys, which wasn’t hard. They were everywhere and tourists were taunting them with bananas left and right. Having heard that these guys were aggressive, we wanted nothing to do with feeding them and merely watched from afar. Except then Riki got ambushed by three monkeys, one of which managed to pull out an empty tissue wrapper from his pocket and another stole his water bottle from his backpack. I was cackling away and taking photos of his misery.

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Three monkeys jumped Riki and stole his empty tissue package and an almost empty water bottle.
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Otherwise they were quite photogenic
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And even cute…
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Except when attacking other tourists

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Sad to leave, but having run out of time on our visa, we headed back to the airport for our flight back over the equator to Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

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Our newest acquisition

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Floating leaves

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Sarongs

Central Java Temples….Yogyakarta, Indonesia

I already could tell that a one month visa in Indonesia was not going to be enough. We spent only one full day in Jakarta before taking the train to Yogyakarta to check out some temples. At this point we didn’t have much of a plan, but spent the first day wandering around the Sultan’s palace and neighboring water palace. And this is a current sultan. Yogyakarta still has a sultan, though he acts much like a governor. Yogyakarta was the capitol when the Dutch re-invaded Jakarta after the Japanese were expelled in 1945. So it has an interesting history, but is not nearly as crowded or busy as Jakarta.

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Lots of good art on walls, streets, buildings, cars and even elephants- though they were painting them white when we walked by.

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There were tons of cool little streets to get lost in, and we were very turned around by the time we were ready to leave the palace area. Two people had told us there was a parade, so we high-tailed it north to Malioboro to check it out. But when we arrived at the Visitor’s Center, they had no idea what we were talking about. Looks like we were being scammed. Luckily, we didn’t pay for a ride or any information, so we were no worse for the wear.

Those two people, however, also told us about a studio with Batik painting. Hesitantly, we walked to the studio to see if that too was a scam. It was not. There is a school/studio that is only open 2 days a week and has an incredible selection of Batik paintings. Batik is done with wax on cloth. The negative section is painted with wax and the rest is dyed. This can be done many times, with many colors, for a variety of effects. The paintings were a range of styles, colors and prices, from $1 to “you don’t want to know.” Of course, I had my eye on a giant one right by the door, by a Batik master (not student), but it was just too big (and expensive). The salespeople were more than happy to sell us a smaller version by the same artist for around $50. It took us about an hour to decide on the perfect one, and I think we made the right choice.

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Our latest purchase – anyone want to make us a frame?

We walked back to our hostel in time for an afternoon rain shower, which was to become a staple of our next few days.

Our second day, we got up at 6 am. To visit a temple. Yes, I know. We do this too much. But Riki is very keen on beating the crowds. It took about two hours by public transport to get to Prambanan, a massive Hindu temple just outside of town, because we had to switch buses a few times and the morning ones seem to be a bit slow. But it cost about $1 for both of us, roundtrip.

The temple was really impressive, and we were immediately offered a free guided tour by some trainees needing to practice. Prambanan is a UNESCO site and was built around the 9th century. It’s pretty impressive with its 150′ main tower. It was in rubble when re-discovered in the 1800’s and wasn’t properly reconstructed until the Dutch took over the project in 1930. It originally had over 200 temples within its complex, though most were relatively small. Only about 20 have been reconstructed. The rest lay in rubble around the perimeter.

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Our tour guides – needed a picture to prove they had practiced.

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We took a free “train” 5 minutes away, complete with billowing smoke from its stack. There is another temple nearby, Candi Sewu, not in nearly as good of shape though. It is a Buddhist temple, from about 70 years before Prambanan. It is the second largest Buddhist temple in Indonesia (the largest we visited next). While we waited for the next “train” to return, we explored a museum about the restoration efforts, though all the captions were in Indonesian, so it was a quick visit.

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The “train” – from travelsort.com

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We returned to town and walked to the bird market, amid the pouring rain. There, among numerous birds of many bright colors, I was surprised to see a cat in a cage and commented to Riki how sad it was that there was a cat in a cage. His response was priceless, “Of course its in a cage, you don’t want to let a cat free at a BIRD market.” Of course not.

Unfortunately, we found many more cats, and dogs, rabbits, lizards and other equally unamused animals for sale. It was a dreary place (partly because of the rain) and a bit of a depressing way to end the day.

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Baby owl, who probably should have been sleeping, not being pestered by people all day.

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The sun came out the next day though, and we once again hopped on the public bus to visit Borobudur, the largest Buddhist temple in Indonesia AND the world. It was built in the 9th century and has over 2,000 reliefs and 500 Buddhas.

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It was an impressive structure, but for some unexplained reason, everyone had to wear skirts, even the women already wearing skirts, and men. Made for some great photos.

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Capturing Riki in a skirt for Instagram

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We were told there were 5 kms of relief sculptures. Not sure if this is accurate, but there were lots. And we looked at most of them, which took about 2 hours. There were some incredible renditions of complex boats and very detailed animals.

A British guy decided to recreate one of the boats depicted in the reliefs. He was successful and within the last few years, sailed it to Madagascar, a route they believed was done by the people at the time of Borobudur’s construction. The boat is on display just outside the temple complex and looks pretty sea-worthy – with typical “crutches” sticking out from the side of the boat, as they still use here to help with stability.

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Kids didn’t have to wear skirts.
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Everybody wants a picture. We must be all over Indonesian Facebook.

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We spent a pretty long time wandering around the concentric rings of reliefs.

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“Alright Riki, its been two hours already. Let’s go.”

We made it back to the bus stop in time for the afternoon downpour and continued back to Yogyakarta to book our plane ticket for the following evening.

Before we had to check out the next day, we went on a walk through some of the little streets that are everywhere in Yogyakarta. They may be my favorite part of this city. None are straight and you never know what will be around the next corner. One time, we ended up on the edge of a small rice field, surrounded completely by houses. We also stumbled across the shoe-making district and peered inside small buildings to watch people cut leather.

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These girls didn’t even have a camera – they just wanted us to have their picture and then ran giggling down the road.

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We took the public bus yet again, to the airport this time, to catch our flight to the island of Lombok, just on the other side of Bali. Yes, we are skipping Bali. Too much else to see.

Lots of rocks @ Angkor Wat….Siem Reap, Cambodia

 We left Banlung in a standard minibus, cramped and speeding down the road, in hopes of meeting our connection in Stung Trang, which should have been waiting on the side of the road for us. Well it wasn’t waiting, but it showed up a few minutes after we pulled over at a deserted intersection. We switched to the empty minibus, expecting the worst, to be put in a packed vehicle for the next 6-8 hours. But we were wrong and the rest of our trip to Siem Reap involved only 5 other people and few stops. Riki was even able to lie down in the back seat and nap. A far cry from our normal bus trips. We even arrived after only 5 hours.

We checked into our guesthouse, a recommendation from an American from Kansas we met at the crater lake in Banlung. A steal at $7 a night, but pretty much deserted as far as we could tell. That night we walked to the central market and tried to get our bearings. We had heard so many different opinions about what to do here and the order to do it in that we were a bit overwhelmed and hoped to meet some people who could offer more insight. We were delighted to find 50 cent draft beers and an American/Swiss couple who had done a quick one day tour of the temples, a bit too speedy for our liking.

The next day, we wandered Siem Reap and bought provisions for the upcoming marathon of temple-viewing. We had heard food near the temples was expensive and it was best to bring your own. Fortunately, we found a bakery and a giant grocery store (not a common sight here). Riki was even able to stock up on Goldfish, and if you know Riki, that is heaven on earth for him.

There are a few options for tickets to see the temples. You can get a one day ($20), three day ($40), or seven day pass (all of which involve getting your picture taken and printed on a paper card). They also all allow you to buy the day before, at 5 pm and enter for free to see the sunset, not counting as one of your days. We hired a tuk-tuk and for an astronomical $7 he agreed to take us to pick up our tickets, watch the sunset at Angkor Wat and bring us back. Angkor Wat is not highly frequented for its sunsets. Most people go there for the sunrise, as you can get a good silhouette as the sun rises behind the temples. So when we arrived at Angkor Wat, the tuk-tuk driver was a little confused why we wanted to stay there the whole time and not continue on to the hill where most people watch the sunset. But this turned out to be the first of a long list of good decisions we made this week. There were not very many people and the crowd thinned rapidly as the tour groups were ushered to the sunset hill. We were too late to climb the tower, but we wandered through the massive complex until we were forced to leave because it was closing. Dilly-dallying the whole way, we managed to be some of the last few to leave and Riki was able to snap some shots with little to no people in them (a rare thing we discovered).

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When we first arrived….Angkor Wat
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I broke out the extra camera for the first time, fortunately for you, none of my pictures are included in these posts as we “forgot” to upload them to the computer.
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As Angkor was closing and we were being herded out the door.

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The next morning at 5 am, we took our rented bikes ($2 each) and rode about 40 minutes into the park. It was pretty chilly and very dark, though the bikes had lights that were supposed to turn on when you started going fast enough. Riki’s worked and mine worked occassionally if you kicked it hard enough or went over the right kind of bump. Though commonly just called Angkor, the archaeological park is home to many many temples, some huge, most not. The Khmer kings a thousand plus years ago would each build a new capital, but not that far from the old ones. The temple part was the only part built of stone. The surrounding city was built of wood and thus did not stand the test of time. Consequently, the remaining stone temples are a bit spread out, with lots of walls, gates and towers remaining. It is possible to reach some on bikes comfortably, but the rest are a bit far and require a tuk-tuk, private car, or as we discovered, an e-bike.

The first temple we reached was Bayon, about 45 minutes before sunrise. The place was deserted and we clamored with our flashlights into the maze of stone. We had counted on being alone and only saw a quiet couple appear just as the sun was rising over the many giant stone faces of Bayon. The sun slowly changed the faces from purple to orange as it rose higher in the sky.

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Morning mist

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Like many of the temples we were to encounter, this one had never been fully completed. For almost an hour I followed the guide we had bought and read about the incredible bas-reliefs depicted in every corner of the temple. Incredible chiseled images of war and day-to-day life lined the walls, some twenty feet tall. And then, just as other people started showing up, having already seen the sun rise at Angkor, I was studying a particularly gruesome image of people being eaten by alligators and a tiger engulfing a man and engorging his claws into his stomach, I was startled by a movement to my right. An agile monkey (as if they aren’t all agile) scampered up the wall and sat right above the scene I was studying.

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Alligator
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Tiger eating a man

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And there were a lot more, coincidentally arriving just as the tour buses arrived from Angkor Wat. And that was our cue to move on. This was our second good decision. The temple complexes have become even more popular, with so many tourists that it can be overwhelming, especially when visiting a place that was meant to be pretty serene. Our itinerary became based on avoiding the crowds as much as possible, something I highly advise to future visitors.

Our second stop was Baphoun, just north of Bayon. It is a largely restored 11th century pyramid with a 16th century giant reclining Buddha at its west wall. Apparently, the very top tower was dismantled to make this Buddha, as they couldn’t find any of the top pieces when it was being restored. Many of the temples have been restored in the past hundred years or so when a French group re-discovered the area and started putting resources together to reassemble the temples. Some temples have been left largely in their dilapidated conditions, either because of lack of funds or just to show the state they were discovered in.

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Playing tour guide….or getting in the way of the shot. Depends who you ask.

The tour groups started showing up and we high-tailed it a little further north to the Terrace of the Leper King. This 20 foot tall terrace flanked the entrance to a Royal Palace and had two sets of carved walls, one inner and one outer. I overheard a guide tell his group it was because they wanted to expand the terrace, so they just built another wall further out and filled in the gap. It was later excavated so you can walk between the two walls and see both sets of carvings.

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We decided not to hire a guide for any of our three days and bought a book ahead of time to read up and be our own guides (see pic above). This didn’t keep me from following around the English speaking guides I came across though. I love the elephants with the supporting tusks and the five-headed horse. The Terrace of the Elephants, flanking the other side of the entrance, surprisingly had less awesome elephant carvings than that of the Leper King terrace.

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Next stop, Preah Pithu Group, oddly named Temples T, U, V, X and Y. These were a bit off the main route, almost deserted and really cool. I don’t think much is known about them, otherwise they would have better names.

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Lots of lichen

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We continued east, to guess what, the East Gate, or Victory Gate. Here, we got off our bikes and walked them up the dirt wall to the path at the top, where we rode south to the next gate, the Gate of the Dead. Apparently, if you came back from fighting your enemies and had won, you could come through the Victory Gate. If you had lost, you had to hang your head and come through the Gate of the Dead. Both were pretty incredible and remarkably similar for having such different purposes, in my opinion.

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Just outside the gates of Angkor Thom (which houses the aforementioned temples), we stopped briefly at two temples that have undergone extensive reconstruction. Thommanom was redone in the 1960’s and has interesting concrete ceilings.

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Ta Keo is being re-done by a Chinese organization. We didn’t even climb up this one. The reconstruction had too much smooth concrete, which made it unappealing to us.

This next one was my favorite temple of the day, though second favorite experience (after the sunrise at Bayon). North of Ta Keo along a sandy overgrown path is Ta Nei. It is not on the main route and is largely in its natural decay. The central area is cluttered with piles of stones and the outside is not much different. We sat and ate our peanut butter and jelly sandwiches and encountered a guy and his guide looking for a lost brown wallet, no luck unfortunately. Probably one of the worst temples to lose something that would just blend right in or get stuck between the rubble.

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Giant tree we ate under
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Ta Nei inner area – all rubble
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Lunch spot

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Ta Prohm is known for being the place that Tombraider was filmed and it is HUGE. We arrived and immediately encountered dozens of tour groups. Having looked forward to this one because of its overgrowth and protruding trees, I gave it my best shot and sped for the far side, hoping it would be less crowded. It wasn’t and I made an executive decision that we would have to come back the next day before the crowds arrived. At this point, I had lost Riki (very easy when he is off photographing things). I headed for our meeting point and sketched until he came to the same realization as I had and returned, overwhelmed by all the people getting in the way of his pictures. Third good decision.

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Too many tourists

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Right down the road is Banteay Kdei. There were far fewer people, lots of lichen and is much smaller. A good one to end on as the view from across the road is nice out over the Srah Srang – a huge royal bath.

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Entry

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We returned almost 12 hours after we had left, exhausted and not sunburned. We took the next day off to do some shopping and catch up on some blogging. We also did some more research on the temples and rented e-bikes ($10/day), which are essentially electronic scooters with pedals that you aren’t supposed to use because it wastes more battery. Seemed backwards to me, but it was cheaper and less hassle than having a tuk-tuk driver hurrying us along all day. Fourth good decision.